Food & DrinkFIND YOUR CAYMANKIND IN THE CULINARY CAPITAL OF THE CARIBBEAN

Sitting down at the tables of the Cayman Islands, it’s easy to understand why it is the culinary capital of the Caribbean. Add the authentic dishes of our islands to the mix, include seafood shacks and five-star restaurants, and you have everything you need for a foodie’s dream vacation or holiday.

Sample the best of what the Caribbean capital of cuisine has to offer on your trip to the Cayman Islands. Grand Cayman restaurants specialize in everything from fine dining cuisine to delicious seafood caught just offshore.

You never have to walk more than a mile from the beach to access top-rated Grand Cayman restaurants featuring some of the world’s top chefs. From casual Grand Cayman dining to five-star culinary creations, you can never go wrong exploring authentic Caribbean dishes.

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Try These Staples of Grand Cayman Dining

The best foods in Grand Cayman are the dishes that have roots in Caymanian traditions and culture.

When you step into a restaurant in Grand Cayman, be sure to taste one of these essential Cayman staples for a real taste of the Caribbean.

Conch Stew

Wondering where to eat in Grand Cayman when you first arrive in paradise? Wherever you decide to go, you need to indulge in Cayman’s twist on the Bahaman national dish of conch stew. 

If you stay in Grand Cayman during conch season from November to April, you’ll find no shortage of offers on this delectable sea snail.

Served in a stew, soup, fritters, or with a crisp salad, take a drive to North Side and spend an evening enjoying a delicious conch dish by the sea.

Johnny Cake

If you want to enjoy a traditional staple across the Caribbean, you have to eat Johnny Cake: small, deep-fried batter bread. 

Johnny Cake goes down perfectly with a glass of rum or as a side dish with a full meal. Johnny Cake can be served with jam, butter, sauteed fish, or eaten just as well alone.

Find them in hotels across the island or one of the many small eateries close to Seven Mile Beach and beyond.

Jerk Chicken

Local cuisine in Grand Cayman means a lot of plump wood-roasted jerk chicken. This traditional Caribbean dish is commonly seasoned with allspice and scotch bonnet peppers. If you’re looking for the ultimate Grand Cayman dining experience and a dish that will pack a punch, jerk chicken needs to be on your list.

Cayman-Style Lobster

Chowdown on a succulent lobster cooked Cayman style. If you’re looking for places to eat in Grand Cayman, be sure your dining experience includes lobster risotto, pasta, or patties. 

Visit Seven Mile Beach to try some flavorful lobster tails cooked with scotch bonnet peppers and hot sauce. Thank us later! 

Cayman-Style Beef

If you’re a meat lover, you can’t visit any restaurants in Grand Cayman and not try Cayman-style beef. We promise it’s the tenderest meat you’ll ever taste.

Cayman-style beef, or as the locals know it, stewed beef, consists of shreds of beef slow-cooked and tossed with hot spices, left to soak in its own juices. The flavor of the meat will excite your taste buds so much you’ll have to eat it again and again.  

Fish and Fritters

No visit to the best restaurants in Grand Cayman would be complete without a Cayman specialty: fish and fritters.

Enjoy snapper, grouper, and whole Mahi Mahi for a salute to the seafaring past of Cayman. Fillets are marinated in lime, salt, and pepper for seasoning and fried with onions, butter, peppers, and spices for a crispy, tender fish dish.

Coconut Shrimp

If you want a succulent seafood dish that combines Cayman's tender shrimp with one of the island’s most popular fruits, try coconut shrimp. Found in most Cayman restaurants, enjoy deep-fried and coated local Cayman shrimp dressed with coconut shavings.

Heavy Cake

Also known as cassava cake, heavy cake is made from cassava, native to Central and South America. Experience the taste of the tropics with cassava, coconut milk, sugar, and a selection of unique spices for a dessert that has been a favorite of Caymanians for centuries.